Cyril Huze Features MGS Custom Bikes True Duals on BLOG

New High Performance True Dual Bagger Exhausts By MGS Custom Bikes

Published by Cyril Huze December 20th, 2012 

These new high performance True Dual exhausts for 1995-2013 baggers are tuned for high performance. Over a year of extensive research and development went into this exhaust system and MGS is stating an average increase of 12+ foot pounds of torque on a stock FL Harley-Davidson model. Better results have been achieved, but are not ordinary. These new True Duals are available in black ceramic or chrome with your choice of three different tip designs. MGS designed them so that ONE part number will fit ALL 95-2013 Harley-Davidson FL touring models. MGS Custom Bikes http://www.MGSCustomBikes.com 661-750-2424.

American Chopper Canceled-Explains all the Network Calls

After 10 years and 233 episodes of a style called the “Doc Soap Reality” TV show, Discovery has decided to cancel American Chopper, one of its most popular programs. The custom bike that you will see in the December 10-11 “4-way build-off” TV show on Discovery, also called “The Revenge” (a face-off against Jesse James and the 2 builders of the series “Fast N’ Loud”) should be the last one built by the Teutuls that you will see on TV.

American Chopper was launched in 2002 as a Discovery Channel special, then reconnected as a regular series. In 2008, Discovery moved the show to its sister channel TLC. A couple years passed, then the litigation between Paul Senior and Paul Junior and arguments with the network prompted TLC to cancel the show. Parties made up and in 2010 the show was relaunched under a new concept: “American Chopper: Junior vs. Senior” Then the series reverted to its original title of “American Chopper” and aired again on Discovery. Whatever the critics, it was a powerful TV show and thanks to their antics and fights, the Teutuls made a fortune. But, who knows what the future holds for the Teutuls… Continue reading ‘American Chopper Canceled After 10 Years On The Air’

Suzuki Jumps Ship On Car Manufacturing In US

Suzuki Ditches Cars for Bikes in US Market

Bart Madson

Bart Madson Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Bashing away at an MCUSA keyboard for more than half a decade, Madson lends his scribbling input on everything from bike reviews to industry features and motorcycle racing reports.

Suzuki Logo

Suzuki will wind down its automobile business in America, as the Japanese marque refocuses its efforts on its motorcycle and powersports offerings. Suzuki’s subsidiary company in the U.S., American Suzuki Motor Corporation, will file Chapter 11 bankruptcy to facilitate the reorganization. The decision to file Chapter 11 and shutter the car business in the States was made during a November 5 meeting of the board. Suzuki cites exchange rate and market trends as two of the reasons why it will discontinue its auto sales in the U.S. Conversely, Suzuki states that it “recognized a possibility that its motorcycle, ATV, marine products businesses could remain profitable and experience increases in sales.” More analysis as of the Suzuki decision is forthcoming, for now the explanatory press statement is posted below courtesy of Suzuki – Bart Madson

Notice Regarding Filing for Chapter 11 Reorganization by American Suzuki Motor Corporation, our Subsidiary in the United States, in connection with the winding down of its Automobile Marketing Business.

American Suzuki Motor Corporation (“ASMC”), a subsidiary of Suzuki Motor Corporation (“SMC”) which distributes automobiles, motorcycles, ATVs, marine products and related parts/accessories in the United States (excluding Hawaii), resolved, during its Board of Directors meeting held on November 5, 2012 (local time), to commence a reorganization proceeding under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, in connection with winding down of its U.S. automobile marketing business and the concentration on its motorcycle, ATV and marine products businesses. As a result, SMC’s distribution of its automobiles in the continental United States will be discontinued.

1. The reason for ASMC’s winding down of its automobile marketing business and concentration on its motorcycle, ATV and marine products businesses

When considering its long-term business plan, ASMC recognized that it will be unable to maintain profitability with respect to its automobile marketing business, taking into account various factors such as economic conditions including the currency exchange rate, market trends, the models of Suzuki automobiles sold in the U.S. which are primarily small cars, ASMC’s projected sales volume and the stringent U.S. environmental and safety regulations. However, ASMC also recognized a possibility that its motorcycle, ATV, marine products businesses could remain profitable and experience increases in sales. Thus, ASMC decided to wind down its unprofitable automobile marketing business and redirect all of its operating resources to its motorcycle, ATV and marine products businesses, to expand these businesses and improve profitability efficiently in all sectors where the prospects for profit are good.

2. The reason for ASMC’s filing for Chapter 11 reorganization

As a way to reorganize the company, wind down its automobile marketing business and concentrate on its motorcycle, ATV and marine products businesses, ASMC has determined to file the Chapter 11. This decision is intended to achieve the following:

(1) to facilitate a smooth transition of the current U.S. automobile dealer sales network into a network of authorized service and parts dealers to allow the company to fully honor all warranties and make service and parts available to customers nationwide as in the past after winding down its automobile marketing business;

(2) to facilitate a mutually beneficial solutions in connection with compensation to be paid to automobile dealers by ASMC in accordance with the stipulated terms and conditions, as they restructure their operations and, for most of the dealers, as they convert to exclusively service and parts operations;

(3) to effectively manage any possible costly and time-consuming legal disputes; and

(4) to realign ASMC as soon as possible in an orderly and fair manner to focus on maintaining and enhancing its motorcycles, ATV and marine businesses

3. Aggregate amount of debt

346 million U.S. dollars (as of September, 30, 2012) 173 million U.S. dollars of which are owed to Suzuki group companies, including SMC

4. SMC’s investment in ASMC and SMC’s claims against ASMC

The amount of the SMC’s investment in ASMC and SMC’s claims against ASMC as of October 31, 2012 are as follows:

(i) SMC’s investment in ASMC
B/S amount of the investment 0 million yen
Entire amount of the SMC’s investment in ASMC of 12,800 million yen (64.7 million dollar) has already been impaired.

(ii) SMC’s claim against ASMC
Trade receivables 10,700 million yen (134 million U.S. dollar)
Loans 2,500 million yen (32 million U.S. dollar)
SMC posted allowance for doubtful accounts of 9,700 million yen on its claims against ASMC as of September 30, 2012

5. Outlook for the future

ASMC plans to commence a reorganization proceeding under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in the evening of November 5, 2012 (local time).

SMC has an intention to support ASMC in its restructuring to ensure that ASMC can wind down its automobile marketing business smoothly and ASMC can ensure the continued expansion of sales of Suzuki brand motorcycles, ATV and marine products in the United States.

As to the influence on financial performance of SMC, we will closely monitor the progress of ASMC’s reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code from now, and disclose promptly once a matter for which disclosure is required has occurred.

6. Outline of ASMC

Company name: American Suzuki Motor Corporation

Location: Brea, California, the United States

Representative: Takashi Iwatsuki

Business: Marketing of automobiles, motorcycles, ATVs and marine products, and components and supplies relating thereto

Stated Capital: 64,700 (thousands of U.S. dollar)

Number of Employees: 365 (as of September 30, 2012)

Date of Incorporation: August 14, 1963

Major Shareholder and its shareholding percentage: Suzuki Motors Corporation: 100%

Relationship between SMC and ASMC: Capital relationship SMC holds all outstanding shares of ASMC.

Personal relationship: Takashi Iwatsuki, a managing officer of SMC and a director of ASMC

Business relationship: SMC sells automobiles, motorcycles, ATVs and marine products, and components and supplies relating thereto, to ASMC.

Whether it falls under the classification of Related Party: ASMC is considered a Related Party of SMC since it is a consolidated subsidiary of SMC.

Financial performance and financial position for the latest three years (thousands of U.S. dollar):

Fiscal Period FY Ended
March 2010
FY Ended
March 2011
FY Ended
March 2012
Net asset value -23,140 -102,060 -117,858
Gross asset value 324,516 341,861 318,608
Net asset per share -0.4 -1.6 -1.8
Sales 936,279 751,053 952,629
Operating profit 87,846 -80,238 -16,282
Current profit 87,918 -79,920 -16,313
Net profit 134,857 -78,920 -15,799
Net profit per share 2.1 -1.2 -0.2
Dividend per share

Note: SMC paid $201,318 thousands to ASMC in the fiscal year ended in March 2010 in order to maintain compliance with U.S./Japan Advance Pricing Agreement.

Harley Davidson Touring Model Oil Change

How To Change the Oil for your Harley Davidson Touring

One of the best things that you can do to improve the overall performance and longevity of your Harley Davidson Touring is to change the oil in it regularly and according to schedule. The oil in a Touring should be changed out about every 3000 miles or so. You’ll find that this will help to keep the engine lubricated, which in turn prevents it from overheating. When the engine overheats, terrible and irreversible damage can be done before too long. Additionally, changing the oil in your motorcycle is easy and requires no more than about an hour of your time at once. It’s faster and cheaper to change the oil at home as compared with taking the vehicle in to a service station, and you’ll get to know the inner workings of your Touring as you work as well.

Step 1 — Gather Your Materials

You’ll need the following tools and materials in order to properly change the oil in your Touring:

  • New oil packages (several quarts)
  • New oil filter
  • Jack stand
  • Oil collection pan
  • New gasket system (optional)
  • Wrench set
  • Newspaper
  • Funnel
  • Towels or paper towels
  • Cardboard piece

Step 2 — Prepare the Touring

Mount the bike up on the jack stand in order to have better access to the oil container portion. This will help you to drain the oil more easily and will provide you with better access to the vehicle in general as you work. Lay out a set of newspapers underneath the area in which you’ll be working, as this will help to collect any oil that drips out. Finally, wait until the motorcycle has been turned off for a few hours before you begin to work; you want the engine to be somewhat warm, but not too hot.

Step 3 — Drain the Oil

Place your collection pan underneath the oil container. Unscrew the filler cap at the top of the container to force the oil down to the base. Then remove the oil drain plug carefully and slowly. As you do, oil will begin to pour out. Catch it in the pan, and continue to hold the pan in place until all of the oil has drained out over several minutes’ time. Then clean up the entire oil container and drain plug with a set of paper towels. You may find that using a piece of cardboard is helpful in guiding the oil to the pan.

Step 4 — Change the Filter

Remove the oil filter and examine it closely for signs of corrosion and damage. You’ll need to use a socket wrench to remove it from the container. If the filter does appear to be damaged, replace it with a new one and throw out the old one. Otherwise, reattach the old filter so you can continue using it. You can do the same with the gasket set as well, although it’s usually not necessary to change this out as often as the oil.

Step 5 — Replace the Oil

Close up the drain plug and then place the funnel into the top of the container. This will help you to pour in the new oil. Pour as many quarts of new oil into the bike as are recommended by the owner’s manual. Once the oil has drained completely into the oil container, close up the container and remove the bike from the jack stand.

Check on the oil levels manually with a dipstick before you turn on the engine again. You’ll want to be sure that the oil is exactly the right level before you continue. If you have to make slight adjustments, do so by adding a little more oil or draining out some of the existing oil to continue.

All of the materials that you’ll need for changing the oil in your Harley Davidson Touring should be available at your local hardware store or motorcycle repair shop.

Wanna avoid the mess and the recycling of used oil? Then stop by MGS Custom Bikes and get your $10 Oil Change all day every day

MGS Custom Bikes True Duals Exaust $10 Oil change

 

Indian Legacy Defied

Baker Drivetrain: Indian Larry Legacy Deified

 larry-1.jpg by Buck Manning

photos courtesy Anthony “Scout” Underwood
Barnetts Magazine

You’ve seen this frame before–no, not one like it–but this actual frame. That is, if you’re one of the legions of Indian Larry fans who watched the Biker Build-Off tribute bike to the much missed Brooklyn builder coming together under the aegis of respectful builder friends. The TV shenanigans of a ten day build-off (taking absolutely nothing away from BBO builders facing an impossible time situation) were illustrated in the on-air scenes where Bert Baker of BAKER Drivetrain helped twist the Indian Larry-style downtube for the tribute bike. Needless to say, this was not the actual one used in the Love Zombie build, but done for television purposes. But fortunately, that piece of historical custom memorabilia didn’t end up being tossed aside. “A couple of months after they did the filming, that downtube came in the mail with a frame attached to it and so we felt obligated to finish the rest of the bike,” says Anthony “Scout” Underwood, self-proclaimed Brand Vandal and Director of Marketing for BAKER Drivetrain. The arrival of this frame fit in nicely with BAKER’s own annual bike build for the photo shoot they do for the company’s calendar and also for the boys in R&D to have something to experiment with. “It gets too political if we farmed out a build ’cause we can’t alienate our customers, so we do it ourselves,” says Scout. “We also do some R&D along the way and explored a few new product ideas of which a couple of them are going to market in the future. These projects are a great moral booster and truly enlighten our guys on what our customers have to experience as they build a bike.”

phoca_thumb_l_Baker_ILL_Deified009.jpgStarting with a Wild Child frame constructed within the bowels of Indian Larry Legacy, it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out what direction this build was going to take. There’s been many a Larry tribute bike done already, but most that I’ve seen have little or nothing in common with Larry’s ideas other than using him as a theme. BAKER R&D’s Chad Behrendt, Tom Peek, and Ryan Sanderlin, set about to build the real thing, not a half-baked universal bobber with a few of Larry’s graphic trademarks stuck on for validity. First up was getting a combo fuel-oil tank direct from Indian Larry Legacy. Besides being authentically cool looking with its myriad of caps and oil lines strewn about, the lack of a conventional oil bag hanging under the seat showcased one of the R&D developments BAKER was working on, but more on that later. Milwaukee Iron was tapped for a fender, which R&D modified to fit, and is held up by a clean, chromed strut/sissy bar they made. A set of politically correct (remember they had to not offend any companies with their parts choices) stock length narrow glide FXR forks hang out at a good handling 30-degrees. Performance Machine’s Vader wheels are enveloped with Metzeler ME880s, a classic-sized 90/90×21 in front and a reasonable 200×18 in back. PM also supplied the stopping power with their 4-piston calipers and wheel matching rotors worked by PM master cylinders for a good looking, good braking system.
 phoca_thumb_l_Baker_ILL_Deified013.jpg With the rolling chassis in place, it was time to choose a method of making it roll by itself. “We wanted somebody really close to tailor the motor how we wanted to see it, shovelhead-style with a lot of polished parts, and to work well with the new parts we were making in R&D,” says Scout. “Greg Gates (of Gates Performance Engineering Inc.), the mad scientist of the motor world, is literally a mile or two away and Bert wanted to use as many locals as he could.” Needless to say, it was a wise choice as Greg turned out a 106″ split rocker box beauty featuring his “Hi Squish” chamber cylinder heads with titanium valves and performance cam sitting on Axtell/Gates cylinders. Greg also modified an S&S G carb topped with a Goodson air cleaner and chose a Mallory ignition to light it off, eventually producing a very healthy 105hp and 117ft-lbs of torque at the rear wheel. The lads from R&D finished it with a wrapped exhaust and Larry’s trademark rear-mount oil filter. Being able to have a classic shovel look and not having to forsake high performance to get it, sure makes for a winning combo.
 phoca_thumb_l_Baker_ILL_Deified017.jpg After placing the Gates mill in the frame, the R&D boys started installing the proto parts they’d been developing. “We were working on mid-controls, but that’s a larger project because it’s part of a proprietary belt drive that we’re still working on,” says Scout. This primary is connected to the obvious showpiece of this bike, the BAKER transmission which becomes a visual focal point for a number of reasons. This is where the fuel/oil tank comes into play. Having open space over the tranny allows BAKER to show off its new 6-into-4 kicker transmission and taking it a step further, R&D made a Lexan (often referred to as transparent aluminum) top cover to show off Bert’s pride and joy, and seeming reason to be, the internal guts of a tranny in all their constantly meshing glory. “We’ve got enough Lexan to sell clear top covers and that’s something we’ll have available soon,” says Scout. For more info on the 6-into-4 tranny and kicker cover check out the Up Close sidebar.
 phoca_thumb_l_Baker_ILL_Deified018.jpg Local boy and custom legend Ron Finch was called upon for the gorgeous paintjob. “He’s a professional and great to work with. Historically, his paintjobs are just tremendous and they’re out there, but he worked with me,” says Scout. “It is a corporate bike and our color palette at BAKER is mostly black. We try not to get too wild and he respected that, but it still looks like a Ron Finch paintjob.” A set of 10″ baby apes on 2″ DBBP-Design risers completes the look and reaches back to a knockout Paul Cox Leather seat mounted on one of his comfy Rigidaire systems.

“We’re all a fan of the man. That’s why we called the bike I.L.L. Deified,” says Scout.

Pope gives Harley Davidson his Blessings

LA Times Reports 2013 Harleys Will Receive Pope’s Blessing at Vatican

 by John Coyle

HDForums

pope-benedict-xvi-0106-big.jpg

The Los Angeles Times has reported that “Pope Benedict XVI will bless [ Harley-Davidsons ] at the Vatican next June as part of the Milwaukee manufacturer’s 110th anniversary.” Want to know more? So would I! But there aren’t many details available just yet.

One one hand, this makes perfect sense, because nothing encompasses the spirit of Harley-Davidson motorcycles like the approval of an authority figure. Especially when that authority figure is a celibate, elaborately costumed octogenarian who is the spiritual leader of one of the world’s largest religions (and smallest country). OK. Maybe it doesn’t make perfect sense.

But Pope John Paul II famously blessed the Ferrari factory, and actually ditched his Popemobile for a Mondial on a tour of Fiorano.  John Paul II was also the recipient of the last production Enzo–which was sold for charity–so it’s not like this is the first time His Holiness has every blessed a vehicle. And since the 110th anniversary celebrations include events all over the world, the Hog’s audience with the Pope doesn’t seem as out there as it initially might, and in heavily Catholic Italy, should generate some nice press for the MoCo.
It’s not clear whether His Holiness will ditch the Popemobile for a 2013 CVO Breakout, but rumors suggest he’s considering repealing Vatican City’s helmet law.

MGS Highlighted in Baggers Magazine

Looks, Sound, & Performance | MGS Custom Bikes True Dual Exhaust System

Install

By Ernie Lopez, Photography by Ernie Lopez
Baggers Mag, July, 2010
Mgs Custom Bikes True Dual Exhaust System Cover Spread

Better sound and more power are two things we hear guys asking for once they get their new bikes home. It seems that everyone out there is trying his or her hand at creating an exhaust system. Sometimes, the pipes we get our dirty little mitts on fall short on one thing or the other. Some have a great sound but have no gains or even rob the bike of power. Some may be able to add a few ponies to the bike but look like crap or sound bad. So whenever we hear “check out my pipes and get 15hp just by bolting them on,” we tend to find it hard to believe.

The same thing happened when Little Mike from MGS Custom Bikes called and said that the shop spent a lot of time perfecting a true dual exhaust system for the bagger market with a top-secret muffler design that will give a 15 percent gain in power and sounds as good as it looks. I told him it was hard to believe. To prove it, he sent over a dyno sheet from the last set that the shop installed on a customer’s Road Glide. The bike picked up more than 12hp and the fuel/air ratio was right on. We told Mike anyone could show off a dyno sheet with a few good pulls. He told me to come see it for myself, and later that week he was doing the same install on a ’10 Street Glide. He said if the pipes did not do what he said they would, he would fill my gas tank up and buy me the best dinner in the Antelope Valley. I figured why not? A free dinner is a free dinner.

Mgs Custom Bikes True Dual Exhaust System Exhaust Pipe

MGS Custom Bikes is a Dyno-Tuning center, and been certified as the only Dyno-Tune center in the Antelope Valley so we knew this was going to be the real deal. Big Mike showed us the pipes and said that after installing and tuning other manufacturers’ pipes for years, he started to figure out the good and bad with exhaust systems. With all that knowledge of pipes and performance, he decided to build a set for his personal bike. After testing, the pipes made good power and sounded great. He eventually began making them to see if his customers would like them.

One cool thing about the True Dual is that the head pipe comes with both sizes of 02 bung ports: a set of 10mm ports for ’10 models and 5/8-inch ports for the older bikes. The pipes are available in show-quality chrome for $989.95 or black ceramic for $1,189.95. Big Mike also recommends that every bike get tuned once the pipes are installed to ensure it runs at its best. If you want longevity from your bike, it is more important to have it running with the best air-to-fuel mix than just getting big power numbers.

We started with Little Mike bringing the bike up to running temp on the dyno to get a base run and see just where the ’10 Street Glide was with the numbers. After two dyno runs, the SG squeezed out 60.1hp and 74.6 lb-ft of torque. Not bad; just about what we expected.
Read more: http://www.baggersmag.com/tech/1007_hrbp_mgs_custom_bikes_true_dual_exhaust_system/viewall.html#ixzz266aFfe5E

MGS Performance Package Deal

MGS Performance Package Deal

Looking for a performance package that wont bog down your wallet? Then this is the deal for you!!

MGS True Duals exhaust systems come complete with head pipe, heat shield, muffler, baffles, all mounting hardware, choice of tips (chrome extra) and two threaded o2 sensor ports with plugs for complete universal fitment of ALL 1995 to 2012 Harley-Davidson FL Touring models.
Made of 16-gauge steel, stepped head pipes, full-coverage heat shields and massive 4-inch mufflers with a billet tip that produces a deep, rich rumble. Dyno-developed by MGS to produce more horsepower and torque than the competition. In most cases a 15% gain at the rear wheel.
The MGS True Duals are one of the easiest ways to bolt on additional horsepower and torque. OVER 12+ ft lbs of torque!

**FREE** BIG SUCKER & POWER COMMANDER W/ DYNO MAPPING

Visit MGS CUSTOM BIKES for details and other packages