Harley Davidson Touring Model Oil Change

How To Change the Oil for your Harley Davidson Touring

One of the best things that you can do to improve the overall performance and longevity of your Harley Davidson Touring is to change the oil in it regularly and according to schedule. The oil in a Touring should be changed out about every 3000 miles or so. You’ll find that this will help to keep the engine lubricated, which in turn prevents it from overheating. When the engine overheats, terrible and irreversible damage can be done before too long. Additionally, changing the oil in your motorcycle is easy and requires no more than about an hour of your time at once. It’s faster and cheaper to change the oil at home as compared with taking the vehicle in to a service station, and you’ll get to know the inner workings of your Touring as you work as well.

Step 1 — Gather Your Materials

You’ll need the following tools and materials in order to properly change the oil in your Touring:

  • New oil packages (several quarts)
  • New oil filter
  • Jack stand
  • Oil collection pan
  • New gasket system (optional)
  • Wrench set
  • Newspaper
  • Funnel
  • Towels or paper towels
  • Cardboard piece

Step 2 — Prepare the Touring

Mount the bike up on the jack stand in order to have better access to the oil container portion. This will help you to drain the oil more easily and will provide you with better access to the vehicle in general as you work. Lay out a set of newspapers underneath the area in which you’ll be working, as this will help to collect any oil that drips out. Finally, wait until the motorcycle has been turned off for a few hours before you begin to work; you want the engine to be somewhat warm, but not too hot.

Step 3 — Drain the Oil

Place your collection pan underneath the oil container. Unscrew the filler cap at the top of the container to force the oil down to the base. Then remove the oil drain plug carefully and slowly. As you do, oil will begin to pour out. Catch it in the pan, and continue to hold the pan in place until all of the oil has drained out over several minutes’ time. Then clean up the entire oil container and drain plug with a set of paper towels. You may find that using a piece of cardboard is helpful in guiding the oil to the pan.

Step 4 — Change the Filter

Remove the oil filter and examine it closely for signs of corrosion and damage. You’ll need to use a socket wrench to remove it from the container. If the filter does appear to be damaged, replace it with a new one and throw out the old one. Otherwise, reattach the old filter so you can continue using it. You can do the same with the gasket set as well, although it’s usually not necessary to change this out as often as the oil.

Step 5 — Replace the Oil

Close up the drain plug and then place the funnel into the top of the container. This will help you to pour in the new oil. Pour as many quarts of new oil into the bike as are recommended by the owner’s manual. Once the oil has drained completely into the oil container, close up the container and remove the bike from the jack stand.

Check on the oil levels manually with a dipstick before you turn on the engine again. You’ll want to be sure that the oil is exactly the right level before you continue. If you have to make slight adjustments, do so by adding a little more oil or draining out some of the existing oil to continue.

All of the materials that you’ll need for changing the oil in your Harley Davidson Touring should be available at your local hardware store or motorcycle repair shop.

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Pope Gives Harley Davidson his Blessing’s

Harley-Davidson announces 2013 bikes, Pope Benedict’s blessing

2013 Harley-Davidson CVO BreakoutHarley-Davidson celebrates its 110th anniversary with the new, 2013 Breakout CVO in Pagan Gold paint. (Harley-Davidson Motor Co. / August 20, 2012)
By Susan CarpenterAugust 20, 2012, 4:30 p.m.

If there’s anything that underscores Harley-Davidson‘s holiness in the motorcycle world, it’s the company’s announcement Monday that Pope Benedict XVI will bless its bikes at the Vatican next June as part of the Milwaukee manufacturer’s 110th anniversary.

While Harley, like much of the motorcycle industry, has suffered significant sales declines in recent years due to the global financial crisis, it remains a steadfast icon — albeit an expensive one that many consumers aren’t able to afford, even if they’d like to.

Harley bikes retail for $7,999 to $38,599. The company, which sells 55% of all motorcycles in the U.S. with displacements larger than 650 cc, is the oldest, continuously operating American motorcycle manufacturer. And it’s celebrating that longevity with a small selection of anniversary models and a large roster of events that will begin next week in Milwaukee and travel to 15 cities around the globe, including stops in Austria, New Zealand, Africa, China, Italy and Mexico.

Harley will produce extremely limited editions of just seven 110th-anniversary models for 2013, all of which will be serialized and sold with commemorative, solid bronze fuel tank badges and vintage bronze or vintage black paint. The 1200 Custom, Super Glide Custom, Fat Boy Lo, Heritage Softail Classic and Road King are among the handful of bestselling models that will be produced as 110th anniversary editions.

For its 105th anniversary, Harley offered twice as many special editions with three times the production numbers. Each of the Harley-Davidson’s 800 U.S. dealerships will receive just two or three 110th-anniversary bikes, which will begin deliveries during the second week of September, according to Harley-Davidson media relations manager, Jennifer Hoyer. The rest of the 2013 lineup will be available this week.

The only new models Harley is introducing are the Breakout, an entirely new CVO, or Custom Vehicle Operations, high-performance Softail with hand-polished steel sections on its fuel tank and fenders. Its popular touring bike, the Road King, is also now available as a higher-end CVO with a new vented windshield and hi-fi audio.

The Street Bob is the only bike to get an update. For 2013, it will have a blacked-out powertrain, chopped rear fender, side-mounted license plate and mini ape-hanger handlebars that can all be customized at the factory level. In a bid to appeal to younger riders, Harley is also building on the Hard Candy idea it launched earlier this year with its new Seventy-Two, a lowrider-inspired Sportster with metal flake paint, whitewall tires and a reasonable $10,499 starting price.

In addition to the Big Red Flake color it debuted earlier this year, Harley will offer metal flake in green and gold as solid-color options on its Seventy-two, Street Bob, Blackline, Softail Deluxe and Forty-Eight models. Thirteen other big flake finishes are also available from its accessory department.

The last time Harley-Davidson celebrated an anniversary — in 2007 — the motorcycle industry was just beginning to taper from 14 years of consecutive gains that pushed annual U.S. unit sales over the 1 million mark. In 2011, sales of new on-road motorcycles in the U.S. had plummeted to about 312,000 units, according to the Motorcycle Industry Council in Irvine.

Retail sales of new Harley-Davidson motorcycles in 2011 were up 5.8% in the U.S., compared with an increase of 1.8% for the rest of the industry, according to the MIC.  This year, Harley’s sales are up 9.3% for the first six months of the year globally.

“The Harley-Davidson name means somewhat less to the current generation than it did to their traditional buyers,” said industry expert Michael Millman, managing member of Millman Research Associates in New Jersey. Earlier this month, Millman’s firm described Harley-Davidson’s business as “cyclic” and “dependent on (high end) consumer discretionary spending,” which is uncertain given the present state of the U.S. and European economies.

Harley’s 110th anniversary celebration is “good publicity,” Millman said, but he’s doubtful it will lead to significant increases in sales. “When you have a birthday, does that change how people treat you at the office?”

MGS at The Streets of Lancaster

Master of Customs and True Duals off to take first place again!!
Last year Mike Stafford, owner on MGS Custom Bike on the Blvd smoked the competition last year with his win during The Streets of Lancaster 2011.

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