Harley Davidson Touring Model Oil Change

How To Change the Oil for your Harley Davidson Touring

One of the best things that you can do to improve the overall performance and longevity of your Harley Davidson Touring is to change the oil in it regularly and according to schedule. The oil in a Touring should be changed out about every 3000 miles or so. You’ll find that this will help to keep the engine lubricated, which in turn prevents it from overheating. When the engine overheats, terrible and irreversible damage can be done before too long. Additionally, changing the oil in your motorcycle is easy and requires no more than about an hour of your time at once. It’s faster and cheaper to change the oil at home as compared with taking the vehicle in to a service station, and you’ll get to know the inner workings of your Touring as you work as well.

Step 1 — Gather Your Materials

You’ll need the following tools and materials in order to properly change the oil in your Touring:

  • New oil packages (several quarts)
  • New oil filter
  • Jack stand
  • Oil collection pan
  • New gasket system (optional)
  • Wrench set
  • Newspaper
  • Funnel
  • Towels or paper towels
  • Cardboard piece

Step 2 — Prepare the Touring

Mount the bike up on the jack stand in order to have better access to the oil container portion. This will help you to drain the oil more easily and will provide you with better access to the vehicle in general as you work. Lay out a set of newspapers underneath the area in which you’ll be working, as this will help to collect any oil that drips out. Finally, wait until the motorcycle has been turned off for a few hours before you begin to work; you want the engine to be somewhat warm, but not too hot.

Step 3 — Drain the Oil

Place your collection pan underneath the oil container. Unscrew the filler cap at the top of the container to force the oil down to the base. Then remove the oil drain plug carefully and slowly. As you do, oil will begin to pour out. Catch it in the pan, and continue to hold the pan in place until all of the oil has drained out over several minutes’ time. Then clean up the entire oil container and drain plug with a set of paper towels. You may find that using a piece of cardboard is helpful in guiding the oil to the pan.

Step 4 — Change the Filter

Remove the oil filter and examine it closely for signs of corrosion and damage. You’ll need to use a socket wrench to remove it from the container. If the filter does appear to be damaged, replace it with a new one and throw out the old one. Otherwise, reattach the old filter so you can continue using it. You can do the same with the gasket set as well, although it’s usually not necessary to change this out as often as the oil.

Step 5 — Replace the Oil

Close up the drain plug and then place the funnel into the top of the container. This will help you to pour in the new oil. Pour as many quarts of new oil into the bike as are recommended by the owner’s manual. Once the oil has drained completely into the oil container, close up the container and remove the bike from the jack stand.

Check on the oil levels manually with a dipstick before you turn on the engine again. You’ll want to be sure that the oil is exactly the right level before you continue. If you have to make slight adjustments, do so by adding a little more oil or draining out some of the existing oil to continue.

All of the materials that you’ll need for changing the oil in your Harley Davidson Touring should be available at your local hardware store or motorcycle repair shop.

Wanna avoid the mess and the recycling of used oil? Then stop by MGS Custom Bikes and get your $10 Oil Change all day every day

MGS Custom Bikes True Duals Exaust $10 Oil change

 

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Japans Tsunami HD Exhibit Opens

Harley-Davidson Museum opens tsunami motorcycle exhibit

By  Jeffrey N. Ross RSS feed

2004 Harley-Davidson FXSTB Softail Night Train2004 Harley-Davidson FXSTB Softail Night Train2004 Harley-Davidson FXSTB Softail Night Train

Ikuo Yokoyama was just one man among hundreds of thousands of people directly affected by the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, but his name will likely resonate with motorcycle enthusiasts for some time.

Yokoyama’s 2004 Harley-Davidson FXSTB Softail Night Train was in a container box that was swept away during the tsunami in March 2011, and it washed up on the shore of British Columbia where it was discovered almost a year later. His motorcycle is now on display at the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the exact same condition that it was found on the remote Canadian beach back in April.

After the motorcycle was traced back to Yokoyama, Harley-Davidson offered to have the bike restored and returned to its rightful owner, but instead he has asked that the motorcycle be kept in its current tattered and corroded state and displayed as a memorial to the victims of the earthquake and tsunami. Yokoyama lives in the Miyagi Prefecture, which was one of the hardest-hit areas of Japan, and in addition to his motorcycle, it’s reported that he also lost his home and three family members as a result of the natural disaster.

Pope gives Harley Davidson his Blessings

LA Times Reports 2013 Harleys Will Receive Pope’s Blessing at Vatican

 by John Coyle

HDForums

pope-benedict-xvi-0106-big.jpg

The Los Angeles Times has reported that “Pope Benedict XVI will bless [ Harley-Davidsons ] at the Vatican next June as part of the Milwaukee manufacturer’s 110th anniversary.” Want to know more? So would I! But there aren’t many details available just yet.

One one hand, this makes perfect sense, because nothing encompasses the spirit of Harley-Davidson motorcycles like the approval of an authority figure. Especially when that authority figure is a celibate, elaborately costumed octogenarian who is the spiritual leader of one of the world’s largest religions (and smallest country). OK. Maybe it doesn’t make perfect sense.

But Pope John Paul II famously blessed the Ferrari factory, and actually ditched his Popemobile for a Mondial on a tour of Fiorano.  John Paul II was also the recipient of the last production Enzo–which was sold for charity–so it’s not like this is the first time His Holiness has every blessed a vehicle. And since the 110th anniversary celebrations include events all over the world, the Hog’s audience with the Pope doesn’t seem as out there as it initially might, and in heavily Catholic Italy, should generate some nice press for the MoCo.
It’s not clear whether His Holiness will ditch the Popemobile for a 2013 CVO Breakout, but rumors suggest he’s considering repealing Vatican City’s helmet law.